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anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
by recalling lifelong support the civil rights movement also opined the brief was legally correct. jay stanley pottinger the assistant attorney general for civil rights argued strenuously against filing. he made three points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only
already had a conservative back lash building against the court from griswold and from civil rights and from miranda even. so it wasn't just this one decision that created that sort of back lash. and the other reason i don't think the parallel holds here is because people who believe, who are pro-life. who are staunchly pro-life, believe that abortion is tantamount to murder. no one thinks that gay marriage is like murder. so i don't think the emotions here run quite as high either. it is hard to imagine people really taking to the streets if doma were to be overturn at this time. >> yeah. and the other part of that is that while the emotions come from the grassroots, there has been a real shift among the political leadership in this country. when you look from president obama to president clinton to hillary clinton to rob portman to dick cheney, cleric mccaskill, jon huntsman. there are a tremendous number of federal officials, highly visible people in both parties. not only saying people should have this right, which is the moral position, but also saying something that i think cr
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not
's the right thing to do. it's a civil rights issue. it's not just gay people who want you to be for marriage equali equality. it's a broad segment of the electorate. if you look at that poll the majority of catholics are for marriage equality. a majority of -- the minority communities are for marriage equality. i just think it is more and more a basic civil rights issue that people are going to expect you to be on the right side of. >> steve, thanks so much. good to see you. >> good to see you. >>> in south carolina today the first test of former governor mark sanford's attempt at a post scandal political comeback. sanford running against 15 other republican candidates for congress. in 2009 you'll remember he stepped down as governor after admitting an extra marital affair with an argentinian woman. among his opponents ted turner's son teddy. the primary is expected to go to a round. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically p
is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement, which they played a leading role in pushing that forward, and ending the war in vietnam, and changing the wail we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstart movements. think all that was incredibly important. the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produced, and that -- all of that, we're seeing that play out today. whether it's the election of barack barack obama or continued advancement of women in congress. there's a lot of work left undone, and i think that there's -- we now spend 3/4 of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30. used to be we spent 3/4 on people under the age of 30. it's not a question of generational warfare, but i think we need to have a conversation about how we're dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements. my general has any belief the government is going to give them that money -- >> host
their candidate. on the right, southern white democrats who were against civil rights, they were being peeled off to vote for george wallace, the symbol of proud segregation. also, different problem for the democrats. people hated the vietnam war. and the president at the time was a democrat, lyndon b. johnson. so if you were against the war, as most americans at that point were -- this is the gallop polling on the war -- the number of people who thought it was a mistake -- if you were against the war as increasingly everybody was, you were so the psyched to vote for lbj's successor. so the democrats were losing their appeal in the south because of racism, and they were losing the anti-war vote. the republican candidate tried to take advantage of that split, and was this handsome devil. nixon in 1968 was running against a democratic party that he knew was split. he was, in response, pledging to get rid of the draft. and he claimed to have a plan to end the war. he argued that if you wanted the war to end, you needed to elect him. you needed to vote the democrats out of office because clearly lbj
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
that they don't think is right. >> but the difference there is that the civil union and marriage are not exactly the same thing. and they're not exactly the same thing in a couple of different ways, important ways. one way is in medical coverage. >> but that -- you're talking about a definition. and what i'm saying is that i think the institution of marriage is a religious institution. but you can have the unions that has the same -- that affords the same people as a male/female marriage the same rights and the same protections under the law. >> you can get married by a justice of the peace or captain of a ship. can those unions be called civil marriage. >> we disagree on this. >> i think that it's important to recognize that when you talk about marriage, it is a religious institution and that people can still have the same rights and privileges, but you wouldn't want to force the church to perform those ceremonies and recognize it as a marriage. >> we have to go to commercial break, but this is a challenge. i think this is the big tent issue. but still ahead, new movie takes an unprecedented lo
and the sewnries -- now there's going to be a version of a civil war. right now as we speak here live on cnn, there's an alternate reality taking place on another network, and they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> i don't really want to disparage them by name. >> donald rumsfeld, ten years ago, became long difficult work, all who played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation. >> well, he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney, wolfowitz are still walking the street. the way they are trying to revise history now is by saying, well, it was a mistake or we were given bad information. you know, let's say somebody sent a tweet to us right now or sent me an e-mail that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement, they have kidnapped children, and they are holding them there, and i then tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find out that there's actually no kids kidnapped in the basement of goldman sachs, and, of course, you would think i would w
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
of the olympic medalist don carlos discuss their personal experiences during the civil-rights movement live at the virginia festival of the book, saturday at 8:00 eastern, part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> on washington journal, we spoke with members of congress about the federal budget. we heard from house budget committee vice-chairman tom price and jerrold nadler. this is an hour. host: now joining us is representative tom price, vice chair of the budget committee. also a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, start by bringing us up to date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution to the 2014 budget. guest: the budget was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. is the pathanding that last evening. it is back in the house and people like the past that today. it is good news. one of the things we included with the approach with spending reductions. the budget is an exciting activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of repr
case this is week. some call the push for same-sex marriage the civil rights issue of our time. they say the tide has turned and that it's time for a change. even karl rove thinks, yes, a republican candidate could embrace same-sex marriage. >> you can imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat out i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> and that's all karl rove would say. i'm joined by san francisco city town dennis herrera and austin nimox. good morning to you both. >> good morning. >> thank you for having us. >> austin, you heard what karl rove just said. are you on the wrong side of history? >> the only side of history with regard to marriage is the right one regarding the truth. and that really should be decided by the american people. americans have an inevitable and inalienable right to determine our own history and that's really a fundamental aspect of america. we have a massive political debate going on in this country about marriage. and the last thing we need is the supreme court to take this debate away from the american people, print a
that trade agreement awaiting not deal with people that violate civil rights. exit code needs to clean their act up and they need to be -- mexico needs to clean their act up and they need to be put into a position where they have to help to clean up the border. .uest: debbie is right mexico has tremendous internal problems and i go into el paso, where people are talking with people that go in the car -- go across the border, and i am hearing from mexican citizens that they are trying to clean up the mess in their country. that would stabilize it. trade from the u.s. to mexico is on the uptake right now, so there are positive things happening, but it is an unstable region. host: a quick question about gun control -- the new york -- the "new york times" this morning saying that the colorado governor as a long path to gun limits. as the cochair of the western falcon -- caucus, what do you make of a western state governor looking like he will sign pieces of legislation? guest: i try to be german not to -- driven by not what will catch the voters, but by principle. the 1994 to 2004 they had
lewis and olympic gold medalist giancarlo discussed their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of "booktv" on c-span2. "washington journal" continues. , at: jerrold nadler democrat of new york, a member of the progressive caucus. representative nadler, in the back toward budget proposal which was voted on yesterday in the house, you say that 7 million new jobs and go one year will be created if the congress and the president would adopt your budget. it would reduce unemployment to nearly five -- two near 5% and three years. it would reduce the deficit by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. and it would strengthen medicare and medicaid amah and you'd be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. -- medicare and medicaid and you would be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. guest: the institute of policy analysis estimated that you are spending money on infrastructure. we have a to point to dollar trillion infrastructure deficit, according to the transportation -- american society of civil engineers. building roads, highways, bridges
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke for a yearning for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also now that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation for justice and dignity and opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peop
working closely with more of the civil rights organizations that have sued. this particular case is, actually, it has been brought by native american tribes, and the reason for that, arizona once again being an outlier in the name supposedly of trying to deny undocumented immigrants from registering to vote which is a nonissue because most undocumented immigrants would not dare to vote. they're afraid to even call the police for a crime. what's happened since 2004 when this law went into effect, over 30,000 citizens have been denied the ability to register to vote or to show when they were at the polls were not allowed to vote. so that is what the lawsuit is about. it's whether the state of arizona can have different requirements than the national voter registration act. >> host: an important issue for illegal immigrants. we actually want to hear from them today, this morning during this segment. if you're an illegal immigrant and you want to call in and give your comments or thoughts on this subject, call us at 202 -- a special line, 585-3883. we can talk about the supreme court de
is not a religious right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decides who gets married in two dozen. so in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving v. virginia, and blacks couldn't marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that nine nothing. it was, they have ruled now 14 times about the fundamental right to marriage. from a legal standpoint there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint there is no argument. so we feel confident that i'm an outcome how broadly the supreme court will rule? that we don't know. >> tomorrow the nation's highest court hears oral arguments challenging california's proposition eight, a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in that state. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1 p.m. eastern. the arguments along with reaction will play again on c-span tomorrow night at 8 p.m. eastern. on wednesday th
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on an impossible task in iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail in syria and back their brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failu
to teach him how to use this stuff. this cannot be right in a civilized society. >> first of all, piers, it's not that i oppose the ban. what i do support is a more healthy debate about the ban, and whatever our legislature, whether state or federal, comes out with, i will support. i'm not a gun person, personally. but i do believe that all sides of the issue need to be focused on and there's other issues that need to be addressed also. mental health checks, access for us. that would be part of the background process. having mental health checks to find out if there's issues within the home. knowing who has these types of weapons. another thing that concerns me is when someone does die who does have weapons. but we're not notified that there are weapons in the home. who takes possession of those weapons for the short term until it's decided who they should go to? then they end up on the streets. so those are the things that i'm concerned about. and i just think that we have to have a really thorough debate about the issue. >> i thoroughly agree with that. and this is a very constructive one
as important, the level playing field. this will ensure safeguards of civil liberties and political rights and obviously encourage political participation. today, we're looking forward to our prime minister form forming his government in the next couple of weeks, based on his consultations with parliament, which is an extension of the same consultation process that led to his designation and receiving the highest number of nominations. so i'm very proud of the progress so far. the hard work is definitely ahead of us and this is the moment we're saying is the third way in the middle east. what we are saying that the arab spring is behind us and we're looking at the arab summer for us all which means we all have to roll up our sleeves, it's going to be a bumpy and difficult road, but i'm very encouraged by the process and very excited about the future. so again, mr. president, very welcome to jordan, i wish you all the success in what you've been able to achieve in the past several days and i hope the success will continue. >> thank you very much. well, it's a great pleasure to be back in ju
of iraq war veterans, vietnam war veterans and the civil war. we are still paying civil war reparations to families. >> that is quite right. there is a whole bunch of things that we could think about military pension, cost of health care, all of these things. >> the results of a multi year study overseen by economists, lawyers and political scientists puts the total cost around $2.2 trillion. one thing is evidently clear it is not $800 billion or 1 trillion the obama administration has estimated. not even close. i'm sam brock and that is today's reality check. >>> we will be able to hear them but not see them when the supreme court justices debate the ban on same sex marriage no cameras will be allowed. the high profile case begins next tuesday. no cameras but the court says it will release audio recordings of the case within a couple of hours of the conclusion. >>> also the search is on for a missing san jose state student last spotted in the santa cruz mountains. 22-year-old gab real smith was reported missing earlier this morning. records show a state park ranger wrote him a ticket f
- based privacy standards to ensure that individual rights and civil liberties are protected. >> thank you. i will submit a question for the record. i would appreciate if you would respond. you talked about supreme court cases regarding the of aerialonality surveillance. do you believe that body of supreme court cases are adequate for guarding the courts and law enforcement in the area of unmanned surveillance? i think theyure are adequate for purposes of man surveillance. with unmanned surveillance, there is an additional danger that as costs go down you see more. i am not sure that they are adequate. they need to be updated. >> inc. you very much. >> the supreme court has held observations made by while following a maned aircraft over a person's property does not violate the fourth amendment. conductere allowed to surveillance over private property at heights ranging from 400 feet to 1000 feet. low must a joan fly over a low mustrophecy -- hwopow prorone fly over private perty. were to if a drone trespass, that would trigger the fourth amendment. it used to be that you own all of the air
has evolved is sort of a script that could have been written in hollywood. >> right. >> because in many ways it actually was written in hollywood. it was november 2008. barack obama had just won the white house. >> there's nothing civil about a man marrying another man! >> but proposition 8 passed, taking away the right for gays and lesbians to marry in california. >> california has made it very clear. >> we're sitting there, you know, kind of licking the wounds and saying, what do we do now 0? and serendipitously, a friend of my wife's came by the table and she says, i think you'd be very interested to find out that you might find an ally in ted olsen on your issue. >> that's the ted olsen, the conservative legal icon. >> that stunned you, right? >> yes. it more than stunned me. it stunned me, but i said, if this is true, this is the home run of all time. i mean, the idea that ted olsen, this arch conservative, the solicitor general for george bush who had argued bush v gore and basically put me in bed for a couple of days i was so depressed after bush v gore was interested in
. >> major delays. >> you're right. >> all right, jennifer delgado thanks to you. >>> secretary of state john kerry trying to stop the bloodshed in syria's civil war as he travels in the middle east this morning. yesterday he met with the iraqi president nuri al maliki but apparently he made little headway convincing him to stop allowing the flow of arms and troops into syria. secretary kerry wants tighter scrutiny of overflights in iraq. he's accusing iraq of helping syrian president assad by allowing armed fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> authorities in mississippi believe a state lawmaker shot and killed herself over the weekend. 63-year-old jessica upshaw's body was found yesterday in former state representative's home. she served in the mississippi legislature for nearly ten years. she represented the district along the gulf coast. >>> an amazing tale of survival by a 9-year-old girl after a horrifying accident that killed her father. the california highway patrol says she was with him in an suv when it veered off california's remote sierra highway in rolled hundreds
, this will be a discussion about where they see the civil war in syria heading. and what the chaos in syria heading and what the chaos could mean for the rest of the region. >> all right, thank you so much for that report live from jerusalem. >>> our coverage of the president's mideast visit does not end here. more live reports from jerusalem later on "america this morning" as well as "good morning america," and you can find additional background on abcnews.com. >>> the pentagon has called a halt to the use of 60 millimeter mortar shells. seven marines killed. several others injured during exercises deep in the nevada desert. investigators trying to figure out white a mortar round fired in the firing tube during the exercise. >>> dramatic new details of the massacre plot averted on the university of central florida campus. police say the gunman had planned to pull the fire alarm and then start shooting as students rushed out of their dorms. that plot was stopped when his roommate called 911 and faced that gunman down. >> he made eye contact with me when he pulled the gun on m
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)